World Cancer Day

Today, Wednesday February the 4th is World Cancer Day. It’s a day you may know nothing about, or only know of from sharing a picture of a candle on Facebook. You may have guessed something was up from the constant news that now, instead of the 1 in 3 statistics we are accustomed to, we now have a 50% risk each of developing cancer.10967809_1623578781195248_1155630041_n

For me though, it’s a little more than a ‘share this if…’ picture day, and more than just a # on twitter.

It is a day to remember and hope, a day to learn.

The announcements of increased risk for all those born after 1960 needs to mean something. We need to take this day, this world caner as a day for change and action. Allow this day to mean more than just one where you like a Facebook post.

We need to stand together, reduce personal life risk, educate ourselves on symptoms and take responsibility of our own health- so we can prevent cancer where possible, spot cancer early when it does develop and see screening save lives.

Currently 4 in 10 cancers are potentially preventable. Think of the impact a change in lifestyle could have rationally. Currently half of all cancers are diagnosed after they have spread. Think of the impact education could give to thousands of people, in cases where secondary cancers mean an ‘incurable’ diagnosis. Currently too many people are skipping routine cancer screening. Think of the impact if everyone who got a cancer screening letter in the post actually went to their appointments, as above cancers would be detected earlier and could improve prognosis.

I know these things won’t save everyone, and some people will be diagnosed after their cancer has metalized, but surely making an effort with the above can only improve things.

The knowledge applies to all ages. Recently someone two years above me in school was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. This means that between the pupils of three consecutive school years at my high school, 4 have had cancer by the time the oldest is 20. And that’s from my working knowledge. The risk of having cancer by 24 is around 1 in 282, which is relatively low risk, but in the statistics game this meant I was the second person in my school year diagnosed by the age of 16.

We all need to be aware. We need to unite in this fight and never let cancer have any sort of chance.

We need to support the researchers, the movers and shakers, the little fish with big ideas and those tireless campaigners funding the research. They are finding better treatments, kinder treatments and hoping for a day where all cancers can be cured, and during that treatment time you have a great quality of life.

So go, educate yourselves! Knowing will not make you any more likely to have cancer.

awareness-card-Ted

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And in adults…

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Change things up!

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Today is for all those I’ve met along this journey- Chloe, Jade, Beatrice, Both Tom’s, Jacob, Yusuf, Cory, Dan, Cameron, Tina, Sonali, Ffion, Hwyel, Jordan, Libby, Beau, Elenid, Harriet, Andrew, Catrin, Louis, Alex, Dave, Amy, Rosa, and so many other people….

And especially for those we’ve lost, Pauline, Becky, Joe and a big inspiration, little Margot. There are others, inspirations and many I wish I could have met.

Hope you take something from this blog today. Its a bit emotional for me, managing my first blog since transplant and carrying what I see to be an incredibly important message.

Keep Smiling,

Emily

 

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Posted on February 4, 2015, in Charities special to us., Em's Blogging. and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. ANDREW BLACKMAN

    Dear Emily, Thank you for underlining these important facts for everyone to read. Keep warm and away from germs Emily. Love and best wishes from Andrew, Emily and Lucy. xxx

    Like

  2. Well done, Em. Really powerful stuff, and really glad to see you back online. Take care and continue to get stronger.

    Like

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